FCE Speaking Part 1

This is a handout to help the students make a good impression in the first part of the FCE Speaking Paper.

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Step One: Explain the students the format of Part 1 and what is expected of them.

Step Two: Now look at the cartoon, ask your students if they think the answer is good, bad or acceptable – giving reasons. Explain to your students the answer is not very good, as the candidate has only repeated the words from the question and hasn’t expanded his answer, for example, explaining why he likes sport or what sports he is particularly interested, etc.

Step Three: Ask your students to think of possible answers to the “wh” questions listed and go through them as a group – this will help them expand upon their own answer,  making it more informative, interesting, etc – it also gives them the opportunity to demonstrate a wider range of grammar and vocabulary.

Step Four: In pairs, ask your students to answer the questions using the “wh” question technique. Remind them to paraphrase and also to think about what tense they need to use – future, past simple, etc. – to avoid making silly mistakes. Go round the class listening to their answers – I really don’t think at this stage it is necessary to “overcorrect” them, they’re getting experience at this point.

Step Five: Go through the learner’s strategies outlined on the Teacher’s Handout.

  • It is important for candidates to remember that the examiners are listening out for good examples of grammar, vocabulary and discourse management; therefore, if candidates only speak briefly, the examiners will be unable or less likely to award marks for these areas.
  • If candidates make a mistake with grammar or vocabulary, they should show that they have recognised their mistake and correct themselves, if this can be done quickly and immediately. But going back and correcting errors highlights the errors for examiners and interrupts the flow, which will affect interactive communication and discourse management marks. So this should be done sparingly.
  • It’s best for candidates not to rehearse extended stretches of speech. This is because there is a danger that their rehearsed speech will not be directly relevant to the interlocutor’s question, and relevancy is an area that’s assessed. Furthermore, candidates often use unnatural intonation and voice range patterns when they are giving a speech.
  • Instead, candidates should prepare by practising the language forms that they are likely to use in the test (e.g., present simple and used to for routines, or structures such as ‘interested in-ing’ or ‘prefer + object + to + object’). Similarly, they should know and be able to pronounce vocabulary associated with their studies or job and general interests and use correct tenses. Note recurrent errors as they speak, and highlight them.
  • Finally, candidates should be reminded that they should be using conversational English during the test.

Teacher’s Handout: suggested answers are included.

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1-11-2

Student’s Handout

fce-speaking-part-1

Teacher’s Handout

fce-speaking-part-1-teacher

B1 Writing

B1 Article

This is a powerpoint based lesson on how to write an article with an explanation and  exercises on how to express wishes.  I’ve used a question from Cosmic B1 (Pearson).

Step 1: Ask your students what they would do if they could take a year off school.

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Step 2: Go over the explanation of how to express wishes and tell your students to do the  exercises.

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Step 3:  Ask your students to read the question and the sample article. Present the powerpoint –  encouraging the students to find and highlight the content points, connecting words, etc. on their worksheets.  Note: each slide gives the students a chance to point these out themselves before revealing the answers. Don’t forget to remind them of the structures when expressing wishes.

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Step 4: Ask your students to write a similar article for homework.

Sample Slides

Slide01

Slide12

Slide18.jpg

Slide22

Credit

Cosmic B1, Megan Roderick (2011)

Free Powerpoint

Article B1 Wishes

Teacher’s Lesson Plan

Article B1 Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Article B1

 

FCE Speaking Part 2

Some time ago, I completed an online course called “How to Teach FCE” on the http://www.cambridgeenglishteacher.org page. There’s plenty of useful information, especially on how to guide the students when doing specific parts of the exams.  I’ve taken the advice they gave on the Speaking Part 2 and put it together on a worksheet with some useful expressions.  Also, as is my”thing” – I’ve  put together a powerpoint with extra practice.

Step One: Read what is expected of the students on Part 2, as stated in the Teacher’s Handbook.

“Candidates are expected to point out similarities and differences between the photographs and then move on to deal with the question, answering it with reference to both photographs.”

Step Two: Ask the students to look at the question and the photos. Go through the “wh” questions with them, encouraging them to use more specific language, for example, instead  of the “person” use tourist, physiotherapist, etc.

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Step Three: Ask the students to match up the example answers with the above questions.

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Step Four: Go through the useful phrases and then give the students 2-3 minutes to put their ideas together and then ask them to do speaking aloud in class, timing them,  and writing down their blaring mistakes. Remember: this is an exercise in mechanics – it’s for them to understand the mechanics of this part of the speaking and give the information that is expected, it’s not a grammar exercise.

Step Five: Explain that the other candidate will have to answer a question related to the topic of the photos.

“The listening candidate is also asked to comment briefly (for about 30 seconds) after their partner’s long turn. They should not speak during their partner’s long turn.”

Do you find it easy to ask for help when you’ve got a problem?

Step Six: Go through these steps again with either material from their course book or  the powerpoint attached below.

Slide01

Slide02

Slide03

Credit

http://www.cambridgeenglishteacher.org/courses/details/500492/teach-cambridge-english-first-fce

Speaking Handout

FCE Speaking Part 2

Free Powerpoint

FCE Speaking Extra – Part 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clothes from Around the World

Here is a quiz I’ve put together using information and lovely images from  www.exeterinternational.com. ( https://www.exeterinternational.com/blog/funny-fashion-traditions-around-world/ )

Slide1

The artist is Tom McIoughlin.

 

I usually use mini whiteboards in class for the students to write their answers on and hold up. You can give an extra clue for the country, I tell them the first letter.

There is an accompanying worksheet with true or false questions and a teacher’s copy with the answers to both the worksheet and the powerpoint.

Slide1

Slide02

Note the information on this slide is incorrect, the Dress Act was passed in 1746 not 1976, and repealed in 1782.Slide03

Slide10

Slide11

Credits

 https://www.exeterinternational.com/blog/funny-fashion-traditions-around-world/

http://www.wikipedia.org

Free Powerpoint 

Clothes from Around the World

Teacher’s Handout

Clothes from Around the World Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Clothes from Around the World

FCE Report

This is a powerpoint based lesson on how to write a report at B2/FCE level. A report is fairly easy to write, as it’s formal, with many set expressions and layout. I’ve used a question from  the old edition of First Certificate Trainer (Cambridge) and rearranged the answer so that it follows the new FCE samples.

Most of my students have difficulties making suggestions, so it would be a good idea to use the powerpoint I posted earlier on how to use suggest, recommend and advise in conjunction with this lesson. (https://proffsenglishworld.com/2016/03/09/how-to-use-suggest-recommend-advise/)

Step One: Briefly explain what a report is, what style it is written in, etc.

FCE Handbook: A REPORT is usually written for a superior (e.g. a teacher) or a peer group (e.g. members of an English club). Candidates are expected to give some factual information and make suggestions or recommendations. A report should be clearly organised and may include headings.”

Step Two: Emphasise that the examiners expect the students to use set expressions. Ask the students the complete the table with the useful expressions listed.

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Step Three: Now ask the students to complete the report with the useful expressions given below.

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Step Four: Ask the students to read the question,  the advice on how to write a report and the sample report. Present the powerpoint –  encouraging the students to find and   highlight the content points, useful expressions, etc. on their worksheets.  Note: each slide gives the students a chance to say the set expressions, linkers themselves before revealing the answers. Don’t forget to remind them of the structures that follow suggest & recommend.

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Sample SlidesSlide01

Slide08

Slide20

Slide28

Slide38

Step Five: Ask the students to write a report for homework. Possible question, taken from Sample Papers 2 available on the Cambridge page:

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(http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/teaching-english/resources-for-teachers/)

Source:

First Certificate Trainer, Peter Kay (2010)

Free Powerpoint

B2 Report

Free Lesson Plan

B2 Report Teacher’s

Student Worksheet

B2 Report Student’s

 

How to use suggest, recommend & advise

I’ve prepared a powerpoint explaining how to use suggest, etc. as many of my students have real problems with these verbs. They really don’t get them – a lot of head shaking and red ink!

I would suggest using this presentation before going over a FCE review or report as both types of writings need a recommendation.

There is a free lesson plan on how to write a review in a previous post (https://proffsenglishworld.com/2016/01/08/fce-review/) – as I keep on mentioning!

Step One: Present the powerpoint.

Sample Slides

Slide05

Slide08

Slide25

Slide18

Step Two: Handout the worksheets to the students, and ask them to do the exercises – encouraging them to look at the grammar explanation on the first page to avoid making the same, old, silly mistakes.

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Free Powerpoint

Suggest

Teacher’s Handout

Suggest Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Suggest Student’s

FCE Writing Summary

Here is a summary I have prepared for my students. Please note that the review is basically for a film or book but there are “Useful Expressions” included for other types of reviews.

I have posted a powerpoint based lesson on writing a review of a website :(https://proffsenglishworld.com/2016/01/08/fce-review/)

On the left hand side is the writing plan and on the right are some useful expressions.

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Free FCE Writing Summary

FCE Writing Summary

FCE Schools: Story

Many students think that a story is the easy option in Part 2 of the writing but I’m sad to say they are gravely mistaken. Writing a story is probably more demanding, grammatically and linguistically than any other – duh! there are no set expressions, etc! It’s a “free” writing but with many students it’s literally a “free fall”. AAAAAAHHHH!!!

They are alone before the danger of failing – with only a trusty “prompt sentence” and two notes to help them. Uff! The odds are heavily stacked against them ……or not!

Here is a FCE question and answer  (slightly improved) taken from Compact First (Cambridge).

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Step 1: Give out page 1 of the student’s worksheet and ask them to read the question carefully. Ask them to read the plan, paying close attention to what is expected of them.

Step 2: Ask them to complete the story with the verbs given in the correct tense.

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Step 3: Give out page 2 and ask the students to underline or highlight the time words, action verbs, adjectives and adverbs in the story.

Step 4: Present the powerpoint –  encouraging the students to correct their worksheets and to highlight the other information asked for on the pptx.   Note: each slide gives the students a chance to identify the finer points of the story.

Sample Slides

Slide01

Slide07

Slide11

Slide27

Slide31

Source

Compact First, Peter Kay (2012)

Free Powerpoint

FCE Schools Story

Free Lesson Plan

FCE Schools Story Teacher

StUdent Worksheet

FCE Schools Story

 

Past Simple: Kids

I need to proofread better – there were a couple of minor mistakes on the worksheet that have now been corrected. Sorry!

Here is another worksheet covering irregular verbs in the affirmative, negative and interrogative forms and finally, short answers.  This worksheet could be used in conjunction with the “Irregular Wordsearch”.

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Teacher’s Worksheet

Teacher’s Past Simple Exercises – Irregular verbs

Student’s Worksheet

Past Simple Exercises – Irregular verbs

Past Simple: Kids

Here is a worksheet with some simple exercises – covering the verb “to be”, regular verbs in the affirmative, negative and interrogative and finally, short answers.  Point out to your students that although these are regular verbs (excluding “to be”, obviously) they need to pay attention to the spelling rules. This worksheet is related to the past simple posters previously uploaded.

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Teacher’s Worksheet

Teacher’s Past Simple Exercises – Regular verbs & to be

Student’s Worksheet

Past Simple Exercises – Regular verbs & to be

 

Another Valentine – Wendy Cope

Wendy-Cope-c-Adrian-Harvey-1024x1024

Today we are obliged to be romantic
And think of yet another valentine.
We know the rules and we are both pedantic:
Today’s the day we have to be romantic.

Our love is old and sure, not new and frantic.
You know I’m yours and I know you are mine.
And saying that has made me feel romantic,
My dearest love, my darling valentine.

Wendy Cope (1945 – )

Sonnet 116 – William Shakespeare

MTE1ODA0OTcxNzgzMzkwNzMz

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me prov’d,
I never writ, nor no man ever lov’d.
William Shakespeare ( 1564-1616)

She Walks in Beauty – Lord Byron

byronstache-1

She walks in beauty, like the night
   Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
   Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
Thus mellowed to that tender light
   Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
One shade the more, one ray the less,
   Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
   Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express,
   How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.
And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
   So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
   But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
   A heart whose love is innocent!
George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824)

Past Simple Wordsearch – Kids

Here is a wordsearch that can be used with the “Past Simple Spelling Rules Poster”. The kids/young teens have to form regular verbs in the past simple and then, obviously find them in the wordsearch.

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Here’s the “Spelling Rules” poster, again.

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Depending on the level of your students, you could get them to use the verbs to write a story.

Free Activity

Past Simple Wordsearch

Free Poster

Past Simple Spelling Rules

FCE Essay

Here is another powerpoint based lesson on how to write an essay at FCE/B2 – it follows the format of my previous post “B1 Essay”.  It is based on a question from the new edition of Gold First (Pearson).

Slide1

Step 1: Give out page 1 of the student’s worksheet and ask them to read the question carefully. The essay has been divided up into sentences, so the students have to put these in the correct order  and then divide them into paragraphs.

Slide2

Step 2: Now ask them to complete the essay plan.

Slide3

Step 3: Present the powerpoint –  encouraging the students to find and   highlight the content points, useful expressions, etc. on their worksheets.  Note: each slide gives the students a chance to say the set expressions, linkers themselves before revealing the answers. Don’t forget to remind them of the structures that follow some linkers- for example, for instance.

Slide01

Slide02

Slide21

Slide31

Slide33

Step 4: Set an essay for homework

Source:

Gold First, J.Bell (2015)

Free Powerpoint

B2 Essay

Free Lesson Plan

B2 ESSAY Teacher’s

Student Worksheet

B2 ESSAY Student’s

FCE Review

Most reviews at FCE level can follow the same 4 paragraph writing plan: introduction, brief description,  opinion and finally, recommendation.  By learning this format and a few set expressions, it is a relatively  easy option to choose even for those “unimaginative” students. I encourage my students to learn the plot of a film or book taken from “Wikipedia” and we go over a review of a hotel and restaurant in class from their course books. So, most bases are covered except for a webpage.

Hey presto! Here’s a powerpoint based lesson  I prepared earlier based on a question from the old edition of First Certificate Trainer (Cambridge).

Slide1

Step 1: Give out page 1 of the student’s worksheet and ask them to read the question carefully. The review has been divided up into sentences, so the students have to put these in the correct order  and then divide them into paragraphs.

Slide2.png

Step 2: Now give out page 2, so that the students can see the full review.

Slide3

Step 3: Present the powerpoint –  encouraging the students to find and   highlight the content points, useful expressions, etc. on their worksheets.  Note: each slide gives the students a chance to say the set expressions, linkers themselves before revealing the answers. Don’t forget to remind them of the structures that follow some linkers /expressions- for example,  after however and recommend.

Sample slides

Slide01

Slide08

Slide11

Slide17

Source:

First Certificate Trainer, Peter Kay (2010)

Free Powerpoint

FCE Review-Webpage

Free Lesson Plan

FCE Review – Webpage Teacher’s

Student Worksheet

FCE Review – Webpage

Phrasal Verbs: Bring

My B2 groups are about to do some exercises on phrasal verbs with bring – I’ve prepared a powerpoint with an accompanying pdf.  Please note not all the definitions for each phrasal verb are given as I’m using the ones highlighted in their course book (Cambridge English: First Masterclass).

Phrasal Verbs with Bring

  1. bring about
  2. bring back
  3. bring down
  4. bring forward
  5. bring in
  6. bring out
  7. bring round
  8. bring up

Sample Slides

 

Slide02

Slide03

Slide28

Slide38

Slide14

Free Powerpoint

Phrasal Verbs-Bring

Free Lesson Plan

Phrasal Verbs- Bring Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Phrasal Verbs- Bring Students’s

Credits

Found on last slide of powerpoint

Vorfreude

Obviously as it’s New Year’s Day, I’m lounging at home nursing a slight but very deserved hangover. Hence, the previous references to champagne. What better than to surf the internet for several hours? Not a lot! So, I’ve stumbled across this curious word:

Slide1

other-wordly.tumblr.com

Example sentences:

When we were kids, for example, we experienced an intense Vorfreude in the weeks before Christmas. (http://krautblog-ulrich.blogspot.com.es)

During the day, I kept my nose down and dug in hard for my studies, but at night– right before I’d slip from the edge and fall into sleep –I’d allow myself to wonder and marvel in thoughts of Vorfreude………. it were these same visions of my future successes that would sustain me, and buoy my resolve to work as hard as I could until those beautiful, easy days of fantasy were reality. (http://unusedwords.com)

Happy New Year

One of my favourite films is “The Apartment” (1960)  directed by Billy Wilder and starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine and Fred MacMurray.

theapartment

C.C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon) is an office clerk who curries favor with the executives in his office by giving them the key to his small apartment for the odd afternoon dalliance. Among them is his callous boss, J.D. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray), who Baxter eventually learns is using his place to sleep with Miss Kubelik (Shirley MacLaine), the sweet elevator operator the clerk has loved from afar. When Sheldrake coldly dumps the vulnerable young woman, she tries to commit suicide, but is saved by the intervention of Baxter. As the clerk lovingly nurses the young woman back to health he begins to realize, with the help of epigrammatic neighbor Dr. Dreyfuss (Jack Kruschen), exactly how much of a fool he has been.

Here’s the final scene when Baxter confesses his love to Miss Kubelik:

Slide1

Bud begins to deal, never taking his eyes off her. Fran removes her coat, starts picking up her cards and arranging them. Bud, a look of pure joy on his face, deals — and deals — and keeps dealing.

 

Credits:

http://www.shinyshiny.tv/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/The-Apartment-movie.jpg
http://www.gstatic.com/tv/thumb/movieposters/4599/p4599_p_v7_aa.jpg
http://www.filmaffinity.com/en/film795770.html
http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/apartment.html

Weather Idioms

I’ve prepared a powerpoint and worksheet on a dozen weather idioms – originally it was for a proficiency class but in retrospect it was much too easy, so I’ll be using it with my B2 classes.

List of weather idioms

  1. on cloud nine
  2. a fair-weather friend
  3. once in a blue moon
  4. come rain or shine
  5. it never rains but it pours
  6. take a rain check
  7. chasing rainbows
  8. a storm is brewing
  9. a storm in a teacup
  10. snowed under
  11. get wind of know which way wind blows

 

Sample Slides

Slide01

Slide02

Slide09

Slide12

Free Powerpoint

Weather Idioms

Free Lesson Plan

Weather Idioms Teacher’s

Student Worksheet

Weather Idioms

Phrasal Verbs: Give

As is my wont, I have prepared yet another powerpoint – this time on phrasal verbs with give. For those who don’t like or can’t do powerpoint presentations there is a pdf with the same questions, etc.

Phrasal Verbs with Give

  1. give away
  2. give back
  3. give in
  4. give out
  5. give up on

Sample Slides

Slide01

Slide02

Slide18

Slide21

Free Powerpoint

Phrasal verbs, give

Free Lesson Plan

Phrasal Verbs- Give Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Phrasal Verbs- Give

FCE Essay

I’ve improved the FCE Essay “pack” – the powerpoint is now available in pptx format – I’ve changed some of the special fonts I was using for images.

Step 1: Give out, both the “How to Write FCE Essay”and  “Three Steps,  Writing An Essay” handouts. Ask your students read them carefully.

Step 2: Ask your students in pairs to underline the key words and think of some synonyms or phrases for them.

Step 3: Now ask your students to brainstorm ideas – including the 3rd note.

Step 4: As a class select ideas for the essay and ask the students to think of useful phrases for each of the 5 paragraphs.

Step 5: Now go through the powerpoint – encouraging the students to underline phrases in the model essay and to take notes – highlighting the importance of each step in relation to the assessment scales.

Sample Slides

 

Slide01

Slide39

FCE EssaySlide59

Powerpoint

How To Write FCE Essay

Free Lesson Plan: How to Write FCE Essay

How to write FCE Essay Teacher

Student Worksheet: How to Write FCE Essay

How to write FCE ESSAY

Three Steps,  Writing An Essay

Three Steps Writing An Essay

Strange Addictions/Weird Habits

My teen classes are just starting a unit on “addictions” – the ones in the course book are fairly healthy, chocolate, exercise, etc – so, I’ve prepared a video activity on weirder ones.  As one of my colleagues would say, “Very strange!”

Please note – Discovery Channel has blocked the compilation of the ·”My Strange Addictions” clips – so, being the sneaky person I am I have decided to upload under a different name: WEIRD HABITS.

 

If my cunning plan fails, find below the links for each clip on the work sheet in order – there are two questions per clip.

Individual clips:

Margaret: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o33mwFOCGLY

Toby: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSk14gy5fsA

Ayanna: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJbuA1LP2gE

Amy & Becky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcsR53djWFo

Gloria: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opWMmmm-uwk

Josh: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIdzaNbdDYw

Cyntrelle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cwnh59-tNU

Kailyn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKSGHvDpE1U

Lauren: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5qwrdNwmQ8

Brea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqxWOJTovOE

Free Lesson Plan

My Strange Addiction Teacher’s

Student Worksheet

My Strange Addiction

Credits:

Discovery Channel

FCE Letter of Application

I love letters of application, because they are so full of set expressions – if the students learn them all they have to do is fill in the finer details asked for in the question. But of course, there’s always that “if”.

Letter of Application Question

So, I’ve prepared a powerpoint with accompanying worksheets – there are a choice of three. I’m so generous!  You can use:

Option 1: The standard one – which includes the question, plan and model – the students have to underline the keywords in the question and complete the plan using the model.

Model Letter of application

Option 2: The gap filling one – so, here the students have to fill in the gaps with the expressions provided, and then underline the keywords in the question and complete the plan using the now completed model.

Gap filling Letter of Application

Option 3: The ordering one – the letter has been divided up into sentences and the students have to cut out the strips of sentences, order them and then divided them into paragraphs using the plan to help them. After which, they can complete the plan using the now ordered model.

Ordering Letter of Application

In options 2 & 3 – you can give the students a copy of the letter after they’ve completed the tasks to use with the powerpoint.

Step 1: Choose the worksheet you want to use with your students – see above.

Step 2: Now present the powerpoint – checking their answers and encouraging the students to highlight the content points, useful expressions, etc.

Sample slides

Letter of Application

Letter of Application

Letter of Application

Letter of Application

Source:

First Certificate Trainer, Peter Kay (2010)

Free Powerpoint

FCE Letter of Application

Free Lesson Plan

FCE Letter of Application Teacher’s

Standard Student Worksheet

FCE Letter of Application

Gap-filling Student Worksheet

Fill in gaps FCE Letter of Application

Ordering Student Worksheet

Ordering FCE Letter of Application

Letter of Application

Letter only FCE Letter of Application

Article B1

One of my teen groups has had to write an article about a gadget they love – so, being the kind, caring teacher that I am, I’ve prepared a handout and powerpoint.

Article Task

Slide2

Sample slides:

Slide01

Slide10

Slide14

Slide26

Step 1: Give your students the handout and get them to read the question and model article carefully.

Step 2: Ask them to underline the key words in the question. Then ask them to complete the plan using the model article.

Step 3: Now present the powerpoint – checking their answers and encouraging the students to highlight the different writing functions in the article.

Step 4: Ask your students to write a similar article for homework – there is plenty of information about the latest gadgets online.

Free Lesson Plan

Article B1 Teacher

Student Handout

Article B1

Powerpoint Presentation

Article B1

Break of Day in the Trenches – Isaac Rosenberg

Pg-23-rosenberg1-getty

The darkness crumbles away.
It is the same old druid Time as ever,
Only a live thing leaps my hand,
A queer sardonic rat,
As I pull the parapet’s poppy
To stick behind my ear.
Droll rat, they would shoot you if they knew
Your cosmopolitan sympathies.
Now you have touched this English hand
You will do the same to a German
Soon, no doubt, if it be your pleasure
To cross the sleeping green between.
It seems you inwardly grin as you pass
Strong eyes, fine limbs, haughty athletes,
Less chanced than you for life,
Bonds to the whims of murder,
Sprawled in the bowels of the earth,
The torn fields of France.
What do you see in our eyes
At the shrieking iron and flame
Hurled through still heavens?
What quaver — what heart aghast?
Poppies whose roots are in man’s veins
Drop, and are ever dropping;
But mine in my ear is safe —
Just a little white with the dust.

 Isaac Rosenberg (25 November 1890 – 1 April 1918)

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The Soldier – Rupert Brooke

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If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is forever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by the suns of home.
And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

Rupert Chawner Brooke  (3 August 1887 – 23 April 1915)

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Anthem For Doomed Youth – Wilfred Owen

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What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles’ rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells;
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.
What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of good-byes.
The pallor of girls’ brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.
Wilfred Edward Salter Owen (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918)
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Present Simple Poster

Here’s a “super” poster I’ve prepared on the present simple tense.  Why have I used the Superman, Superwoman & Krypto the Superdog images – subliminal message – the “S” of he/she/it.

This probably needs to be printed out on A3 cardboard to get the full “super” effects!

Slide1 (3)

Poster

Present Simple Poster

FCE Informal Email

I’ve prepared a worksheet and powerpoint explaining how to write an informal email – I’ve based it on a question that appears in the new Gold First Coursebook.

Slide1 (1)

Slide1 (2)

Step 1: Ask your students to read the handout carefully, including the model email

Step 2: Go through the powerpoint – getting the students to underline and complete the handout where necessary.

  1. Underline key words in the task
  2. Brainstorm ideas for plan & useful expressions
  3. Highlight useful expressions, content points, etc. in the email

Step 3: Ask them to write an email for homework from their course book.

Sample Slides:

Slide01

Slide08

Slide17

Slide33

Source:

Gold First Coursebook, New Edition (2014) – Jan Bell & Amanda Thomas – Pearson

Free Powerpoint

FCE Informal email

Free Lesson Plan

FCE Informal Email Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

FCE Informal Email Student’s

Remarkable Lives

This is a video activity based on the remarkable life of Dame Stephanie Shirley – (http://www.steveshirley.com) for both older teenagers and adults at B2/C1 level.

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“Dame Stephanie ‘Steve’ Shirley was born Vera Buchtal to a gentile mother and German Jewish judge in Dortmund, Germany. They had fled to Vienna, and only weeks before the outbreak of the Second World War, her parents put her and her nine-year-old sister on one of the Kindertransport trains taking 1,000 refugee children across Europe to London to escape the Nazis.”

“She went on to create a multibillion-pound IT software consultancy, the F1 Group, from which she made a £150m fortune. When F1 was floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1996, it was worth £121m, she gave a huge chunk of her shares away to the staff who ended up owning more than half the company. Seventy became millionaires.

“Shirley retired in 1993 at the age of 60. Since retiring, she has devoted her life to giving away most of her wealth – up to £135m to autism research.”

Dame

Step 1: Ask your students to read the brief biography of Dame Stephanie on the worksheet.

Step 2: Ask them to read the questions they need to answer after watching the video.

Step 3: Watch the video and then get your students to try to answer the questions – this could be done in pairs.

Step 4: Watch the video again and correct the students’ answers.

Step 5: Use the last question, “How would you describe Dame Steve and her life? ” as a springboard for a more general discussion. For example:

  1. What does success really mean?
  2. Does success always bring happiness?
  3. Is being famous the same as being successful?
  4. Do you think some famous celebrities are good role models? e.g. Kim Kardashian
  5. Are women treated differently in the workplace? If so, what can be done to create real equality?

Step 6: You could ask the students to prepare a  presentation on another “remarkable life” using videos, powerpoint,etc.

There is another interesting video, “Freelance Programmer: the Story of Stephanie Shirley” that gives more insight into her life and career.

Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Shirley

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/dame-stephanie-shirley-success-has-a-cost-women-today-are-so-na-ve-9687846.html

https://www.ted.com/talks/dame_stephanie_shirley_why_do_ambitious_women_have_flat_heads?language=en

https://youtu.be/vMJMGHTkOq8 (Video with English subtitles)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5nzJ1rQBew

http://www.steveshirley.com

Free Lesson Plan

Dame Stephanie Shirley Teacher’s

Student’s Worksheet

Dame Stephanie Shirley Student’s